Waikanae Primary School The children of today are the leaders of tomorrow. Ngā mokopuna o te ra nei Ngā rangatire o āpōpō.

Te Waharua

Kia Kaha

Be Strong and Courageous

 

Years 1-4

Waharua denotes the small, double diamond shapes that are said to represent a ‘double mouth’ or ‘two mouths’. It was a pattern traditionally utilised to represent courage and commitment. 

The significance of the pattern is about the two pathways or the partnership that is formed between matua (parents) and the school when their precious taonga, their tamaiti (child) enters the school environment.

It acknowledges the tremendous courage a child demonstrates in their first years at school, these years being the most important in their positive transition into formal learning.

The three diamonds found in the centre of the pattern signify the first three years in the syndicate.

 


Te Aramoana

Kia Manawanui

Be Strong of Heart & Self Determining

 

Years 5-6

Te Aramoana is a significant chevron pattern representing a pathway leading to and from the ocean. 

When the sun sets behind Kapiti Island, the sun reflects and glimmers upon Te Rau o Te Rangi (the sea channel) creating ‘Te Aramoana’.  This sunlit pathway denotes the hopes and dreams of whanau that their tamariki will fulfil whatever goals they set out to achieve in life.  The school is an important and influential environment to shape and nurture these types of skills within our tamariki.

More importantly, when the seas get rough, like Te Rau o Te Rangi, Kapiti Island provides a symbol of unwavering strength and commitment. 

This likens to the child shaping their own character, identity and standing strong.

More importantly, when the seas get rough, like Te Rau o Te Rangi, Kapiti Island provides a symbol of unwavering strength and commitment.  This likens to the child shaping their own character, identity and standing strong.


Te Poutama

Kia Maia

Be Capable and Confident

Years 7-8

Te Poutama is a stairway or stepped pattern symbolising genealogies.  It also relates to the pathway of learning, striving for knowledge and attaining intellectual achievement. 

This pattern is derived from the creation story of Tane-o-te-wananga in his quest for Nga Kete o Te Matauranga - the three baskets of knowledge. 

The importance of this creation story is not just in the attainment of the baskets but more so in the learning attained on his journey to get there.  The steps show the ongoing learning that occurs throughout life and symbolises the transition from primary school and the preparation for  college.