Waikanae Primary School The children of today are the leaders of tomorrow. Ngā mokopuna o te ra nei Ngā rangatire o āpōpō.

   Analysis of the End of Year Over All Teacher Judgements (OTJs) in

Reading, Writing and Maths December 2011 

 

‘National Standards’ are not ‘National’ neither are they ‘Standard’


The Waikanae School Board of Trustees has major concerns re the impact of the National Standards Policy. We urge you to take into account the following points when reading this analysis.


It is the Board’s view that the National Standards are in fact NOT ‘National’ nor ‘Standard’.  The Standards are broad and imprecise, and every teacher across the country who assesses a child against them will interpret their students’ progress against them differently.  Waikanae School teachers have worked hard to moderate their judgements to achieve as much consistency as possible. However due to a lack of any national moderation processes this consistency has not/will not/cannot be achieved across schools on a district or a nationwide basis.  Because of this lack of moderation our achievement data once removed from our immediate learning environment loses its validity and relevance.


We are very concerned about the requirement to send school level OTJ data to the Ministry of Education.  We believe that the centralisation of schools' OTJ  achievement data will result in published league tables.  While National Standards can be usefully implemented within our school as one of a range of tools with which to report on students' achievement, their inherent subjectivity means that the data becomes unreliable when it is removed from within our school setting and centralised.  Furthermore if we are going to have League Tables that compare schools surely the Tables should compare ‘apples with apples’.  This will not be the case in this instance.


It is also the Board’s view that published league tables will have a range of unintended consequences, including narrowing the teaching focus to the basics of reading, written language, and mathematics and narrowing schools’ focus on to students who can be shifted rather than those with the greatest need.  New Zealand's current broad-based curriculum gives all children opportunities for success.  A narrowed learning environment will not provide underachieving children with opportunities to succeed or children who achieve highly with opportunities to be stimulated and extended. 

 
In summary, we see our school's achievement data (including National Standards OTJs) as being safe and reliable within our school and we will continue to use this data to assure our community and the Board that our children are making progress and achieving as should be expected.  We also commit to the fact that we will continue to have a ‘warts and all’ approach to the reporting of School wide Student Achievement Reporting.
With these thoughts in mind our analysis of our interpretation of our students’ achievement as measured against the National Standards follows. 

 

Introduction

 

All students have been given End of Year assessments for Reading, Writing and Maths.  The assessments are Overall Teacher Judgements (OTJs) and are the teacher's judgement as to whether the student is meeting the relevant National Standard for the end of the year.

Students were given one of four grades for each area assessed.  It is worth noting that for the purposes of Reporting Individual Student Achievement to parents (via the Mid and End of Year Reports) the two grades of Achieving Well Below and Achieving Below were combined into one grade of Achieving Below Standard. They are spilt in this group due to MoE reporting requirements.

·         At year end the student was achieving above the National Standard appropriate for either their time at school or year level (more than12 months ahead). 

·         At year end the student was achieving the National Standard appropriate for either their time at school or year level (between 0 to 12 months ahead). 

·         At year end the student was achieving belowthe National Standard appropriate for either their time at school or year level (between 0 to 12 months behind). 

·         At year end the student was achieving well belowthe National Standard appropriate for either their time at school or year level (more than 13 months behind).

 

Description of Cohort Groupings 

Category

Number of Students in Test Group

Percentage of Test Group

Description

All

506

100%

All students tested from Year 0 to Year 8

Maori

55

11%

All students identified upon enrolment as Maori

New Zealand European

359

70%

All students identified upon enrolment as New Zealand European

Other

68

13%

This category includes all students identified upon enrolment as being Asian, South East Asian, Other and Other European

Pacific Peoples

24

5%

This category includes all students identified upon enrolment as being Samoan, Fijian, Cook Island Maori

Other Pacific Peoples

11

2%

This is a subset of the above group and contains 11 Kiribati students for whom English is a second language

Lexia

44

8%

This is a group of students identified in February as needing extra help in reading and writing.

ESOL/ELLS

32

6%

Those students for whom English is a second language

Year 1 Boys

16

3%

Those Year One Boys enrolled in the Year 1 Boys Only Class

Year 2 Boys

23

4%

Those Year Two Boys enrolled in the Year 2 Boys Only Class

 

 

Achievement Summary

Reading All                82% of students are achieving at a level that indicates that they are achieving at or above the National Standard appropriate for either their time at school or year level. 

Writing All                 73% of students are achieving at a level that indicates that they are achieving at or above the National Standard appropriate for either their time at school or year level. 

Maths All                   71% of students are achieving at a level that indicates that they are achieving at or above the National Standard appropriate for either their time at school or year level. 

 

Reading Maori          84% of students are achieving at a level that indicates that they are achieving at or above the National Standard appropriate for either their time at school or year level. 

Writing Maori           79% of students are achieving at a level that indicates that they are achieving at or above the National Standard appropriate for either their time at school or year level. 

Maths Maori             74% of students are achieving at a level that indicates that they are achieving at or above the National Standard appropriate for either their time at school or year level.

 

Maori achievement is at or slightly higher than the levels of achievement for all students at Waikanae School.  There is no disparity in achievement between Maori and Non Maori. 

 

 

Overall achievement levels are highest in Reading

Overall achievement levels are lowest in Maths.  

By Year 8 Writing is the weakest area with only 64% achieving at or above the National Standard. 

Results in all three areas trend downwards over the eight years.

 

 

The lowest performing Year Group cohort is Year 6 with: 

81% achieving at or above the National Standard in Reading

62% achieving at or above the National Standard in Writing

50% achieving at or above the National Standard in Mathematics 

 

 

Other Pacific Peoples perform poorly in all three areas with

11% achieving at or above the National Standard in Reading

11% achieving at or above the National Standard in Writing

11% achieving at or above the National Standard in Mathematics 

This cohort only contains 11 students (2% of student population) all of whom are very recent immigrants. English is the second language for all of these 11 students.

 

 

  

It is worth noting that in 2009 75% of Year 12 Students attending Paraparaumu College passed NCEA level 2.  Our OTJs for Year 8 Students Achieving At or Above the National Standards mirrors this pass rate Reading 77%, Writing 73% and Mathematics 74%.

 

 

 

Graph 1

Graph 2

Graph 3

 Graph 4 

Graph 5 

Graph 6

 

Graph 7

 

Graph 8

 

Graph 9 

Graph 10 

Graph 11 

Graph 12 

Graph 13 

Graph 14

 

Graph 15

 

 

Graph 16

 

 

Graph 17

 

 

Graph 18

 

 

Graph 19

 

  

Graph 20

 

  

Graph 21

 

  

Graph 22

 

 

Graph 23